Episode 491

ERLC Proposal to Foster Care Agencies, DR Serving Meals to Secret Service & An Urgent Plea For Churches

Nov 30, 2023

The Ethics & Religious Liberty Commission is urging the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) to rescind a recently proposed regulation regarding foster care providers and foster children who identify as LGBTQ+. The chefs who are preparing meals for hundreds of Secret Service agents, Georgia Highway Patrol troopers, National Guard troops, and others providing security during three days of memorials for former first lady Rosalynn Carter have vast experience feeding huge crowds, usually in disaster zones. And, in the Baptist Press Toolbox, Chuck Lawless urges churches and believers to reach out to college students.

Transcript

The Ethics & Religious Liberty Commission is urging the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) to rescind a recently proposed regulation regarding foster care providers and foster children who identify as LGBTQ+.

The regulation, proposed on Sept. 28, specifies steps foster care agencies must implement or maintain so that children in foster care who identify as LGTBQ+ are ensured a “safe and appropriate” placement if requested.

ERLC President Brent Leatherwood said the proposed regulation is a severe violation of religious freedom.

He says the regulation forces Christian parents and foster care agencies into an LGBTQ+ affirming worldview which would violate their religious beliefs.
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The chefs who are preparing meals for hundreds of Secret Service agents, Georgia Highway Patrol troopers, National Guard troops, and others providing security during three days of memorials for former first lady Rosalynn Carter have vast experience feeding huge crowds, usually in disaster zones.

In their trademark yellow shirts and caps, Georgia Baptist Disaster Relief volunteers have been busy in mobile kitchens preparing delicious meals. All at no charge.

Rosalynn Carter died Nov. 19 at the age of 96. She was laid to rest Wednesday in Plains, Georgia as her 99 year old husband and family continue to grieve her passing.
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Good News for Today is sponsored by The Voice of the Martyrs

Good News for Today is made possible through our friends at The Voice of the Martyrs, a nonprofit organization that serves persecuted Christians around the world. Founded in 1967 by Richard and Sabina Wurmbrand, VOM is dedicated to inspiring believers to deepen their commitment to Christ and to fulfill His Great Commission — no matter the cost. Find out more and sign up for their free monthly magazine at vom.org/goodnews.
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In the Baptist Press Toolbox, Chuck Lawless urges churches and believers to reach out to college students.

1. College students are at a significant juncture in life—stepping into their own lives and forming their own conclusions and beliefs. That context generally makes them more open to talking about options, including Christianity. They are questioning, inquisitive, and listening.

2. They make real commitments when they genuinely choose to follow Christ. Their passion and faith sometimes put mine to shame. They’re unafraid to stand alone. They take notes when listening to the Word. They want their friends to know Jesus. They accept the challenge to go to the nations.

3. God has often begun awakenings with college students. In the Second Great Awakening, God moved at places like Hampden-Sydney College and Williams College (where the “Haystack Meeting” occurred). The 1970 revival that began at Asbury College in Kentucky spread to multiple campuses in the U.S.—and we recently saw glimpses again of that movement. God could do the same today.

4. They represent a global mission field. More than 1 million international students are attending US colleges and universities. They’ve come here to study—but perhaps God brought them here to hear the gospel. I’ve met many students over the years who first learned of Jesus and chose to follow Him because of a collegiate ministry, and I’ve known some who took the gospel back to their home country.

5. They rightly challenge us to explain our faith. They’re not interested in superficial, routine Christianity. Rather, they want authenticity, depth, and relevance—and they’re unafraid to ask questions we should be ready to answer.
In the piece, he offers suggestions for way church can be active in reaching college students.

You can read the full piece and learn more about our daily emails at Baptist Press.com.

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