Episode 075

Ancient Hebrew, Disaster Relief, & Good Friday

Apr 15, 2022

Further evidence of ancient Hebrew language, in the form of a lead tablet with a written inscription, has been discovered near Mt. Ebal in Israel. An Oklahoma pastor is grateful for the work of fellow believers who live across the street and across the country. And today is Good Friday. The day set aside to remember the crucifixion and death of Jesus Christ.

Transcript

Further evidence of ancient Hebrew language, in the form of a lead tablet with a written inscription, has been discovered near Mt. Ebal in Israel. The finding has been hailed as a major boon to the case for an older Old Testament.

Mt. Ebal is mentioned in Deuteronomy 27 and Joshua 8, where it describes Joshua building an altar to the Lord.

According to media reports, the tablet with the inscription which includes the word Yahweh, the Old Testament name for God, was originally found in 2019 by a team from the Associates for Biblical Research (ABR) led by archaeologist Scott Stripling.

Stripling reportedly found the artifact in a location that have been previously identified as the altar Joshua created in Joshua chapter 8.

The group determined the tablet could be the oldest piece of known evidence of the name of God “Yahweh,” in the Hebrew language. The organization dates the article as potentially being from the late Bronze Age, around 1200 or even 1400 B.C.

An Oklahoma pastor is grateful for the work of fellow believers who live across the street and across the country. Luke Holmes, pastor of First Baptist Church in Tishomingo, Oklahoma recently shared an encouraging word with Baptist Press about the help his community received as they recovered from devastating storms.

He said workers from across the country responded quickly to help clean up storm damage in his community.

Meanwhile, local churches not directly affected by the storms opened their doors to provide food, clothing and toiletries those who were.

Holmes goes on tell about how other believers came to the aid of hurting people on a very difficult day. Read the full piece at Baptist Press.

Good News for Today is sponsored by The Voice of the Martyrs

Good News for Today is made possible through our friends at The Voice of the Martyrs, a nonprofit organization that serves persecuted Christians around the world. Founded in 1967 by Richard and Sabina Wurmbrand, VOM is dedicated to inspiring believers to deepen their commitment to Christ and to fulfill His Great Commission — no matter the cost. Find out more and sign up for their free monthly magazine at vom.org/goodnews.

Today is Good Friday. The day set aside to remember the crucifixion and death of Jesus Christ. The ancient prophet Isaiah wrote of the Messiah,

“But he was pierced because of our rebellion,
crushed because of our iniquities;
the punishment for our peace was on him,
and we are healed by his wounds.
6 We all went astray like sheep;
we all have turned to our own way;
and the Lord has punished him
for the iniquity of us all.” — Isaiah 53:5-6 (CSB)

May we remember the importance of this Good Friday.

Find more stories at BaptistPress.com.

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