Episode 059

Substance Abuse, Foster Children, & College Basketball

Mar 24, 2022

The COVID-19 pandemic has affected every family in America and the problem of substance abuse…worsened by the pandemic…may live on for years. Foster children are one of the most overlooked and underserved groups in our nation. And maybe you’ve never heard of Albert “Bones” McKinney, but you should have.

Transcript

The COVID-19 pandemic has affected every family in America and the problem of substance abuse…worsened by the pandemic…may live on for years.

The National Institute on Drug Abuse says researchers have observed increases in substance use and drug overdoses in the United States since the pandemic was declared a national emergency in March 2020.

The group looked at the monthly per capita sales of alcoholic beverages in 14 states. They say the sale of hard liquor peaked with a 30 percent increase in 2020 based on an average of the previous three years.

Foster children are one of the most overlooked and underserved groups in our nation. Most communities struggle to find placements for these children. Local churches in the United States have more than enough homes to solve the problem, but few Christian families are pursuing fostering. But what happens when people in your congregation start fostering children?

In a piece on Baptist Press, Sam Rainer offers a few suggestions and benefits for local churches who look for ways to care for children in the foster care system.

First, your church is woven into the fabric of the community. Caring for foster children forces you to be an active part of your community.

Second, your church is recognized as a solution to community problems.

Third, your church is pushed outward.

Which leads the church to be compelled into a posture of selflessness.

Good News for Today is made possible through our friends at The Voice of the Martyrs, a nonprofit organization that serves persecuted Christians around the world. Founded in 1967 by Richard and Sabina Wurmbrand, VOM is dedicated to inspiring believers to deepen their commitment to Christ and to fulfill His Great Commission — no matter the cost. Find out more and sign up for their free monthly magazine at vom.org/goodnews.

There are many famous names associated with basketball in North Carolina. Maybe you’ve never heard of Albert “Bones” McKinney, but you should have.

After a career playing in college and the pros, McKinney enrolled at Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary in 1952. Married with a growing family, McKinney wondered how he would provide for them.

While sitting in class one November morning, Wake Forest basketball coach Murray Greason pulled him out of class to offer him a position as an assistant coach. He held the role for five years before becoming head coach.

While building Wake Forest into a championship program, McKinney also served as assistant chaplain at the school and continued preaching throughout the state.

“Bones’ reputation around the state was the same as what Billy Graham’s was nationally,” said Billy Packer, a star guard on Wake’s 1962 Final Four team. “

Find more stories at BaptistPress.com. Thanks for listening to Good News for Today. I’m Brandon Porter.

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